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Fruits

Membrillo // Quince

Membrillo // Quince

Although not used in a multitude of recipes in Peru, the quince makes an appearance now and then.

The quince is grown on trees and is related to apples and pears. You would suppose that even just by looking at it! The fruit is usually yellow to green on the outside, covered by a layer of fuzz. Once peeled, the fruit is a light yellow color which quickly turns reddish upon contact with the air. In reality, the quince is not eaten like other pome fruits – you would not typically just take a bite from it and enjoy the juicy, sweet flavor…it has neither! You can allow it to stay on the tree and continue to ripen until it reaches a state in which the raw fruit could be eaten. However,

Membrillo // QuinceThe quince is used for things like jams, wine, and even made into dulce de membrilloa sweet paste often paired with cheese, in Latin American countries. Additionally, some countries use the fruit for its medicinal properties. The pits can be soaked in water, the drunk as an alcohol free cough medicine. The jam, stirred into boiling water, is drunk for intestinal issues. The seeds in several countries are used to combat pneumonia.

Here in Peru, the most popular way I see quince used in boiled with other fruit to make the delicious Chicha Morada drink.

Discussion

3 Responses to “Membrillo // Quince”

  1. I’ve had something I think is a membrillo paste that is really excellent. Hard for me to find quince.

    Posted by MyKitchenInHalfCups | May 3, 2012, 11:29 am
  2. I’ve only tasted quince paste…but I’d love to try the cocktail you mentioned :)

    Posted by Liz | May 4, 2012, 7:43 am
  3. What a bizarre looking fruit. The Chicha Morada sounds really good though!

    I’ve nominated you for a Versatile Blogger Award; wonderful blog!

    Posted by Andrea | May 6, 2012, 4:27 pm

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